Tuesday, April 15, 2014

It was mostly the Spring wildflowers we'd gone to see.

Among others, we saw sweet white trillium, just starting to bloom, on the hike.
The umbrella-like Mayapples have their tiny hidden fruits.
The delicate sharp-lobed hepatica. I think.
Pennywort. I have no idea why it's called that.
Trillium luteum, or yellow trillium, with a lemony scent.
Bloodroot, which produces the tissue-destroying toxin sanguinarine.
Trout lilies.  The petals fold back as they bloom.
And the trout lily's shadow cousin, the anti-trout lily.
And the star of our hike, a hillside absolutely covered in stunning bluebells.

36 comments:

  1. So pretty! We had tons of mayapples in the woods behind our house, and a few of the white trillium. Today, we are getting a few inches of snow, so no flower hunting today :(

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    1. It's only in the 40's here today and raining, but climbing again through the week.

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  2. tissue destroying toxin....hmmm....is there anyone i need to send flowers to?
    hahahaa

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    1. And they're pretty, so not suspicious at all!

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  3. Beautiful. We got snow as well. Its been snowing for six months.

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    1. Fortunately the most recent was a one day thing here and we're back to Spring now.

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  4. These photographs are STUNNING! The color and clarity you captured in each one is just awesome!

    "Bloodroot"

    I've never seen or heard of those flowers before, but they're beautiful. As well as the Bluebells!

    Really nice selection of flowers in this post!
    X

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    1. Thank you! Often I have no idea if I got a good shot until I load it onto the computer. :-)

      I had heard all the names before but couldn't have identified them on my own.

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  5. Those are beautiful! And I'm impressed that you know the names. I usually go with something like "white flower" since I'm terribl at flower names.

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    1. I only know them because someone on the hike knew them. And then I had to look them up at home to make sure I was remembering correctly. Trillium and mayapples were the only ones I could identify with certainty.

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  6. Blue flowers make my heart flutter every time .

    I wish I were in the shape you're in. Weight and knees : blah!

    Love
    kj

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    1. Aren't they gorgeous?

      It's funny - I almost didn't go because my knee was inexplicably hurting. But I'm glad I did.

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  7. I'm pretending I was with you when you took these.

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    1. Sometimes vicarious hiking has to stand in until warmer weather hits.

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  8. All great pictures of the flowers; and good for you for knowing so many names of them. I liked the picture with the shadow of the anti-trout lily. I think I would have enjoyed hiking and seeing all these beautiful flowers and blooms.

    betty

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    1. That shadow photo was serendipitous. I was just trying to get a shot of the flower itself.

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  9. I love wildflowers and those are all very pretty.

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  10. Thanks for sharing the Bluebells and the others. I need some cheering up after watching snow flurries fall here this evening. Blah...

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    1. We got snow flurries Monday. Unbelievable.

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  11. Quite beautiful!
    Loved the bluebells especially.

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  12. You have some really delicate species that seem to be different from our wild flowers.
    Thanks for showing them.
    Maggie x

    Nuts in May

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    1. The Smokies have an amazing variety of wildflowers.

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  13. All these wildflowers are lovely Good thing none were blooming here, what with the ice pellets and snow and below freezing temps we've had the last couple of days.
    The trillium is our provincial flower and illegal to pick.

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    1. It's illegal to pick any flower at all in the Park.

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  14. It appears you really know your flowers. That berry eating mentioned in your last post is good survival knowledge. I wonder if flower knowledge would help survival in the wilderness.

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    1. I don't, but I'm learning.

      There are many wildflowers that have medicinal uses, so I guess in that way they could help.

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  15. I love this series of posts on wildflowers, hikes and your women's group. I would have found it so hard to give up the St. Brigid's Cross! Well done!

    XO
    WWW

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    1. That's the beauty of blogs - that St. Brigid's cross is captured here forever.

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  16. Pretty. Guess it was a successful hike.

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  17. You do this just to make me jealous, don't you.

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    1. No, I do it to remind myself that I made it through another winter. :)

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  18. lovely, your earlier than us flower photos always give m a bit of hope for spring to eventually arrive.

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